Glossary

  • A
  • This tissue is composed of long, abaca fibers and is semi-transparent, resembling Japanese papers in its appearance and construction. It can be treated like a lightweight fabric and used for a variety of different purposes and projects.
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  • Fine, glossy synthetic fibers that melt and fuse when heat is applied. Angelina comes in a wide variety of iridescent colors and can be stitched, fused with other fibers, or impressed with a rubber stamp and a warm iron.
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  • A 2½" x 3½" piece of art backed with felt or a firmer backing such as cardboard. Artists often use them for business cards and/or trade them for fun.
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  • C
  • Artwork made from objects that are glued down onto a surface, such as a piece of paper, canvas, or board, and the technique of making such an artwork. The objects can be whatever you wish, for example tissue paper, wrapping paper, newspaper pages, magazine
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  • Color value is how dark or light a color is. When pieces are cut from colors of the same value, they blend when placed next to each other.
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  • D
  • A neutral colored "wall" where artists hang their work to preview their layout. The wall is often covered with flannel or bating so the pieces stay in place without pinning.
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  • A painting technique in which, as the name suggests, a little bit of paint is put on a dry brush. When applied, it produces a broken, scratchy effect.
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  • Fade-resistant and often water-resistant inks.
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  • E
  • Usually used with rubber-stamp techniques, embossing powders are dusted onto pigment-inked images, then heated with a heat gun causing the powder to produce a shiny, enamel-like finish. Powders come in clear, colors, metallic, and iridescent.
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  • A method of painting which uses pigments melted with wax and fixed or fused to the painting surface with heat.
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  • Vintage or antiquarian paper items other than books, such as postcards, photographs, greeting cards, decorative cutouts, paper dolls, signs, and so on.
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  • F
  • This nonwoven fabric is created by applying continuous friction to fibers, often wool. Felt can be extremely soft or firm enough to be used as a construction material. It comes in a variety of colors, shapes, and sizes.
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  • A spray acrylic that, when applied to artwork, keeps the medium (paint, ink, pastel, etc.) from smudging. Comes in matte and glossy.
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  • An area of color painted in a uniform or identical tone and hue.
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  • A type of acrylic paint that, as the name suggests, are more liquid (fluid) or runny than 'normal' acrylic paints, with the same intensity of color.
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  • The element in a painting that pulls in the viewer's eye, the center of attention or the main subject.
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  • A type of machine stitching that allows you to move around the fabric sandwich or paper quilt in any direction, creating geometric, flowing, or random patterns. Sewing machines must be specially equipped for this function, or must have the capacity to
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  • Very thin sheets of webbed, dried glue that can fuse fabrics and other fibers together when activated by heat. Comes in cut sheets or on a roll, housed between two layers of release paper.
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  • To target and cut a specific printed motif from fabric or paper, rather than randomly cutting.
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  • G
  • An acrylic polymer medium that can accept color media and other additives, such as glitter or fine beads, to create texture when applied to a surface.
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  • Gel-inked ballpoint pens that come in many different sizes and in a huge variety of colors. They are primarily used for thin patterns or writing , but can be used for coloring small areas in a specific color. The distinguishing characteristic is, of course
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  • A thick white or black chalky mixture that can be painted onto paper or fabric to provide a rough-textured surface.
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  • A water-soluble paint that is opaque, rather than transparent like watercolor. Gouache and watercolor paints can be used together.
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  • H
  • This tool blows hot air in a focused direction in order to melt, heat set, or burn fibers, powders, and other materials.
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  • Using heat (from an iron, heat gun, or clothes dryer) to make dyes, transfers, paints, or inks that have been applied to fabric permanent.
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  • I
  • A polymer emulsion (paint) containing titanium-coated mica flakes. Painted over a dark color you see the labeled interference color. Painted over a light color you see the complimentary color. The color changes depending upon the angle you've viewing
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  • J
  • A strong paper that comes in different patterns and colors, and can be stitched.
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  • K
  • A term most commonly used to describe art that's considered overly sentimental, pretentious, or banal. It's used to dismiss such art as being in bad taste, of poor quality, or simply for having too much mass appeal. Kitsch is also used to describe
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  • A 100-percent cotton broadcloth often used for dyeing.
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  • A blend of acrylic fibers that melt when heated
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  • L
  • Lokta paper, or Lama-Li, is cultivated from the Daphne Bush that grows high in the Himalayan Mountain region of Nepal. Tibetan refugees create the most exquisite and versatile handmade lokta papers on the planet. Lokta has four deckled edges and is a
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  • What is Lutradur? This is a polyester fabric-like material that has a wide variety of applications. It can be drawn or painted on to create a colored surface that still filters light. It is quite sturdy and can be cut into without fraying, and heat set
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  • M
  • A group of threads and fibers stitched together by machine to create unique cords.
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  • An acrylic polymer medium that can be used to extend paints, increase translucency, and decrease gloss.
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  • W ax-based polishes that are housed in small pots and come in a variety of colors. You apply them with your finger and they are great for accenting raised areas.
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  • A corner (usually of a border) that is joined at a 45 degree angle, like a frame.
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  • An acid-free brand of glue produced by Plaid ® . Mod Podge is useful for collage and decoupage as it can be used both to glue something down and as a protective layer over it (instead of varnish). It is available in a gloss, satin, or matte finish
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  • A water-based, acrylic polymer emulsion that dries to an opaque, semi-gloss finish. Once hard, acrylic paint and other media can be applied.
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  • This paper has lots of texture and its edges feather easily when wet. Available in a huge range of colors in both lightweight and smooth and textured handmade styles.
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  • N
  • Needle felting fuses an additional layer of fiber onto a base fiber or felted fabric. This can be done by hand with a needle felting brush or piece of foam and felting needle(s), or using a needle felting machine. In both cases, the fabrics/fibers are
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  • O
  • Literally, to dye or paint color over another dye or printed pattern. Many artists like to alter commercial and vintage textiles by overdyeing, thus creating unique fabrics.dye
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  • P
  • A transparent, non-yellowing gel medium. You can mix this with acrylic paints to produce a thick, self-colored textured surface on fabric.
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  • A non -woven polyester backing. Fiber artists use different weights of Pellon to create a support for unstable textiles that require more body, and a firm, smooth application, such as silk, gauze, and chiffon. It can also be used on its own for painting
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  • Mercerized twisted, non-divisible, lustrous 100% cotton thread in a skein .
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  • Fabric that has been “prepared for dyeing,” which makes it better able to absorb and hold the color. It can be bought by the yard at fabric stores.
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  • Photographic images can easily be transferred onto fabric using photo transfer paper. First, the photograph is printed onto the paper, which is then ironed onto the fabric, transferring the image.
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  • These inks typically come in vibrant colors. They are quite thick in consistency and dry slowly; for this reason they are excellent for use with embossing powders and rubberstamping.
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  • Transparent stamps that make it easier to position your stamped image where you want it.
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  • R
  • The symbol of quality is still a paper that is made from 100 percent cotton rags. At one time, rag meant cotton taken exclusively from cotton textile remnants. Now very few cotton papers are made from rags, either entirely or partially. The difference
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  • Stitching or fusing one piece of fabric to another without turning the edges under.
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  • A tacky film that allows you to stick fabric or paper in one place and then move it without harming the substrate, usually paper, underneath. Comes in tape, dots, spray, etc.
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  • A sharp cutting device, similar in shape and function as a pizza cutter, that can be used with a straight edge to accurately cut fabric.
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  • Also known as straight stitch, this basic stitch is done by passing the needle in and out of the fabric or paper at equal intervals, about 1/8"-1/4" apart. Running or straight stitch is used in hand quilting to piece together the quilt top.
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  • s
  • Two or more fabrics or fibers stitched on top of each other. For example, two pieces of fabric with batting in between, or a piece of felt stitched or fused to another fabric.
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  • Also referred to as serigraphy and silk screening, this is a printing technique that uses a woven mesh screen to print onto fabric. A stencil is attached to the screen and only the areas left exposed allow the ink to transfer through as a roller or squeegee
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  • Small, round mirrors used to decorate fabric, often a feature of Asian Indian clothing.
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  • Sticks of oil paint in solid form that look like a large crayon. The outer coating must be peeled off before each use because the sticks self-seal after 24 hours.
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  • Cocoons, the purest form of silk, can be stretched and spun into yarn or left whole for collage and other fiber art projects. They can be bought pre-dyed or ready for dyeing and/or hand painting.
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  • These dyed silk fibers are harvested from the silk cocoon and stretched over a frame to form 10" squares. The layers can be separated and are wonderful for applying to the surface of felted projects.
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  • These are byproducts of reeling silk from the cocoon; silk accumulates on these rods and remnants of it remain. The resulting rods can be dyed or separated into layers, and used in paper making, stitching and silk fusion.
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  • A general-purpose white glue for school, craft, and household use. Sobo withstands multiple freeze-thaw cycles and dries fast and clear.
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  • Applying dye selectively to different parts of a textile, randomly or in a pattern.
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  • A faux painting technique that gives new surfaces an elegant, aged look made by repeatedly tapping on a surface with paint or ink and a stiff brush. While most methods of faux painting hide imperfections, stippling actually highlights them. It is best
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  • A detergent made for rinsing excess dyes out of fabrics without damaging the set colors.
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  • T
  • Using tea to alter the color of fabric or paper. Tea dyeing is often used to “age” new fabric or paper, giving it a vintage appearance. (Coffee can also be used for this purpose.) Depending on the kind of tea and the length of time it comes
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  • Special sheets used to protect iron and ironing board from fusible web residue.
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  • What is Timtex? A non-fusible, extra-firm stabilizer. It is commonly used as a base for decorative houses made of fabric. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE
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  • What is Transfer Artist Paper? A kind of image transfer paper used for photo transfer to fabric with an iron. The resulting image is colorfast, washable, ironable, and stretchable. TAP can also accept drawings and designs made with crayons, markers, and
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  • Applying inkjet or toner copy images to fabric using different media, such as water, polymers, and other media.
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  • Clear acetate sheets that can be printed on and stitched to paper or fabric. They can also be used to make transfers by spritzing the image on the transparency with rubbing alcohol or applying gel medium, and then burnishing the back side to tansfer the
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  • U
  • The remnants of quilts started, but never finished are affectionately referred to as UFOs by quilters. UFOs are unfinished objects.
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  • The initial or lowest layers of paint put down in a painting before the detail of the painting is put down. Some artists use underpainting to establish tonal values in a painting, effectively painting a monochrome version of the final painting to get
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  • (Ultra-thick embossing enamel) Similar to regular embossing enamel, but, as the name suggests, it's thicker and can be impressed after heating.
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  • V
  • A natural polymer made from wood pulp. In the 1920s the word rayon was adopted, replacing viscose. Viscose was first used for coating fabrics, which it did quite successfully. Further development led to viscose being spun into thread for embroidery and
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  • W
  • Made from walnuts, this very dark ink can be used to “age” papers and other materials and to tone down bright colors.
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  • Also known as the lengthwise grain, straight grain, or straight-of-grain; the warp runs parallel to the selvage edges. It is made up of threads that run parallel to the length of fabric as it comes off the bolt.
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  • A combination of a fountain pen and a brush, consisting of a head with the brush on it and a handle that's a plastic reservoir that holds water. The two parts screw together and apart very easily. A slow, constant trickle of water comes down the brush's
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  • Fabric that disappears in cold or hot water (depending on the brand and its use) after it has been stitched on, leaving only the stitching.
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  • This fine polyvinyl fabric feels like very thin plastic. It needs to be doubled in an embroidery hoop to be stitched on, but is ideal for creating lacy patterns. When immersed in hot water, the background polyvinyl disappears leaving just the lacy embroidery
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  • Sticks of color that draw like a crayon but that turn paint-like when water is applied.
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  • Also known as the crosswise grain, this is the thread that runs perpendicular to the selvedge of the fabric. The weft and the warp are straight grains (as opposed to the bias) so cutting along these grains will result in fabric pieces that don’t
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  • A fusible web product with a paper backing (often called release paper). It must be ironed to adhere it to fabric. You can also fuse other fibers to it, as well as apply other art materials like paint and foil.
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  • X
  • A thick, creamy medium that can be applied with a brush, roller, or sponge. It expands when heated, can be painted, and it is non-toxic.
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  • What is Xyron? Xyron is a branded cutting system that cuts shapes, fonts, and images. There are a number of accessories to add to the creativity. It is effective, but requires quite a financial investment, including buying the system and replacement cartridges
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